3 Solutions to Data-Heavy Presentations

set-infographics-urban-demographics-data-icons-elements-illustration-retro-design-36416890Sometimes you can’t avoid giving presentations that are heavy on data. Examples of this would be presentations for demographics, market researches and such. So how do you solve this? How do you make your presentations interesting even if it’s full of data and numbers?

Below are 3 solutions:

1. Use Notes pages – use the Notes pane and put some of the data there. You can print this out later to be distributed among your audience.

2. Send to Word – Send your presentation to Microsoft Word.

3. Use letter-sized slides – This is best used when you won’t be projecting slides at all.

You can read the complete instructions on how to apply these solutions by heading to this post: Handouts for data-heavy presentations

 

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A Different Way of Creating Menu in Your Slides

For your first two slides, it is useful to create menus. This time though, we can do it differently and pattern it to Windows 8 for instance. You can do this using PowerPoint.

Here are the basic steps:

1. Create the shapes

2. Format the shapes

3. Hyperlink the tiles

Following these basic steps, you can come up with something like this:

powerpoint-tips-tile-interface-menu-1

To know the complete instructions on how to create a different kind of menu for your PowerPoint slides, please check this post: Create a tile menu with hyperlinks to slides

PowerPoint 2013 Tip – Zoom into a slide and choose another slide in Slide Show view

microsoft-office-name-logo-computer-screen-windows-44549021Do you know how to zoom into a slide and choose another slide in Slide Show view–PowerPoint 2013? With the new features of PowerPoint 2013, you can do the following:

  • To see an area of the slide close up, Zoom into a slide.
  • In that magnified view, pan around the slide.
  • After looking at all of the slides, choose a slide to display.

Head to Ellen’s post to watch the video on how to do this.

How to Make a Post-It Checklist Graphic for Your Slides

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Do you use checklists on your slides? If you’re the type who creates slides that talk about lists with X number of items, then you might want to come up with a checklist graphic just to make it more pleasing to the eyes.

One example done by Ellen Finkelstein is a post-it checklist. Of course you can come up with other images. In her blog post, Create a checklist graphic in PowerPoint, she mentioned getting sample photos for free at freeimages.com. But if you already prefer the post-it checklist graphic, she will teach you how to:

1. Get the Post-it® note
2. Add the checkboxes
3. Add the checkmarks and numbers

Head to her post now and find out more!

How do you make your slides the size of your paper?

????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????This is a new idea by Ellen Finkelstein for people who only print slides, meaning, those who use presentations that never get projected on a screen.

It is still best to use PowerPoint because its layout is easier to use than Word. You can easily place charts and images here as compared to Word. This is because PowerPoint, is a graphics program, making placement easy.

Here is one idea for switching from the usual landscape slide size to a vertical and bigger slide size:

Create a custom layout that includes a title, a text placeholder and another placeholder that can contain an image or a graph. Start with the Two Content placeholder, duplicate it, and then make adjustments.

For more information on how to do this, please head to: Do you present with printed slides? What if your slides were the size of your paper?

Use a Blank Slide for a Powerful Presentation

blank-projector-canvas-office-shot-40629971Do you use PowerPoint slides when presenting? Have you come up with a powerful technique to distinguish your talk from the ocean of PowerPoint presentations you show your audience?

Well, this post is all about that powerful technique. There is that one unique slide you can use that presenters oftentimes overlook —the blank (blacked-out) slide used at critical moments.

Below are three ways you can use this blank slide:

  1. Start your presentation with a blank screen – this way YOU become the first impression of your presentation and not your slides. 
  2. Blank the screen during your presentation – this will make it feel like you’re having an intimate moment with your audience.
  3. End with a blank screen – the closing of your presentation is the last thing your audience will hear. By ending with a blank screen while you give your closing remarks, your audience’s focus will once again be directed towards you. 

For more insight about this, please head to:

Superior Presentations 75: The Most Striking PowerPoint Slide to Include in Every PowerPoint Presentation

Set the Exact Position of an Object in PowerPoint

ruler-to-measure-to-know-18665805To those using PowerPoint slides in their presentation, do you know how to precisely specify the position of an image or object? Maybe you’d say that it is easy because usually, it is. But it is only easy when you know where to find the settings.

Most of the time, PowerPoint users would want to specify the position of an image so that images on adjacent slides would be in the same place and it won’t look like you are jumping from slide to slide. There will be uniformity in the slides and the entire presentation would look flawless. 

There are two usual solutions on how to do this:

1. Copy and Paste

2. Use a Ruler

However, there is a third and best solution for this which is to:

3. Specify the Exact Position

By doing so, you can now match the exact positions of two objects or easily set the position of 1 object.

To know more about how to do this, please head to: How to specify the position of an image or object on a PowerPoint slide–precisely