Malala Yousafzai’s Speech Considered to be the Best Speech of 2013

Malala YousafzaiMalala Yousafzai is a young 16 year old lady who addressed the United Nation with a speech considered to be the best speech of 2013. Unfortunately, she was shot in the head in Pakistan less than a year ago because of her outspoken nature and because she wanted to learn. This inspired the world to create an  inspirational advocate for global education.

Malala Yousafzai is touted to be a great global communicator and below are just 6 of the lessons we can all learn from her speech.

  • Practice – She was not “winging it.” She practiced the speech countless times and it showed.
  • Preparation – Malala knew this was her opportunity to deliver a powerful message, and prepared with that in mind.
  • Message Development – There was no mistaking what Malala’s message was. It was not buried in facts, details or statistics. It was relevant, actionable, repeatable, enduring and relevant. (The RARER method)
  • Call to Action – In fact, several direct calls to action. “We call upon ..” was the beginning of six sentences.
  • Pausing – there was no dis-fluency in Malala’s address. None. Why? Malala employed strategic pausing that helped to root out dis-fluency, and also added to the power of her delivery. Key pauses were employed throughout.
  • “Chunking” – Malala was delivering from a written document (I am unsure if it was a prepared text, or notes), but only spoke while looking down once. Instead, she looked down at her written document, captured a “chunk” of what came next, paused, looked up, and delivered it.

To find out more about Malala’s speech and the lessons we can learn from her speech, please head to:  12 Lessons from the Best Speech of 2013: Malala and Public Speaking 

 

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About presenternews
I write about presentation skills and provide news from the presentation skills blogosphere.

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